Posts Categorized: style

Reader Request: Dressing Up a Casual Work Ensemble

An anonymous commenter had this request:

Almost all of my clothes are casual work, but from time to time, I actually want to go out. I can put together cute work outfits pretty easily, but feel like I look bland in the evening. How can I take casual work clothes and make them work for going out?

Great question! And a few easy pieces, tucked away in your bag or car, can help transform a dressed-down day look into a spruced-up night look.

STATEMENT NECKLACE

statement-necklace

I know, I know. The phrase “statement necklace” has been uttered so many times it makes most of us cringe. And yet, it accurately describes this piece of jewelry: A big, bold, chunk of a necklace that makes a true stylistic statement. READ MORE

Originally posted 2010-12-27 06:05:39.

Reader Request: Family Vacation Style

dressing for family vacation

Reader Ursula posted this question to Facebook:

Have you written about how to dress for family vacations (Disney specifically) and not look like you are trying too hard (or too little as the case may be)? Struggling with function and body image on this one.

I’ll admit to never having entered a Disney theme park and I don’t have kids myself, but I’ve been to loads of amusement parks for day trips and taken plenty of vacations – with family and alone – that require similar amounts of walking and standing in line. (Think art museums in Florence in June. LINES, people, oh the lines.) So although I can’t speak from direct Epcot-based experiences, I will make my suggestions and ask those of you who have done Disney or similar family trips to lend a hand in the comments! READ MORE

Originally posted 2014-06-18 06:44:04.

What We Can Learn from Dressing

As a person who loves and explores style, I understand my body now in ways I never did before. I don't fear it, I don't avoid it, and I feel like I can converse with it through dressing and clothing. And I'm much happier now that we're on speaking terms again.

Before I became interested in dressing and style, I avoided thinking about my body. At all costs. I didn’t look in the mirror if I didn’t have to, didn’t focus much energy or attention on how my outfits interacted with my figure, and did my utmost to think about anything besides my own physicality. Because of this choice, the information I was given about my body came almost exclusively from external sources. And none of it was good news: I was chubby, disproportionate, my breasts were too small and my hips were too big, my arms were flabby and so was my stomach. Virtually all of this information was comparative: I was flabby compared to Gwyneth Paltrow, my breasts were too small compared to Victoria’s Secret models … you know the drill. I studiously ignored my body, hoping its perceived inadequacies would diminish if I pretended I was a brain in a jar. And yet this comparative information still crept in and made me feel inadequate. READ MORE

Originally posted 2013-09-16 06:02:50.