Posts Categorized: proportion

Reader Request: Unexpected Proportions

style tips proportions

Cee popped this question into the suggestion box:

It would be wonderful if you could address issues about dressing “unusual” combinations. For example, broad shoulders and a small bust, or a larger tummy and a flat bottom. I think often styling advice is based on the presumption that if you have one feature, it will be paired with another. Of course, we all know we carry our breadth, length and weight in lots of different ways.

My guess is that women with “unusual” proportional combinations become acutely aware of them while shopping. While casual observers may anticipate that the majority of bodies will express some form of balance that falls within the statistical norms, I don’t think it’s carefully monitored. For instance, I’ve never looked at a woman and thought, “Gosh, she’s got a small bust for such broad shoulders.” But when the woman in possession of those traits goes to try on clothes, she may find that manufacturers expect her to fill out certain clothing based on how big or small she is elsewhere. read more

Originally posted 2012-12-17 06:42:04.

Necklaces and Necklines Revisited

necklaces necklines

Waaaaay back in 2009, I cooked up this tutorial on pairing necklaces and necklines. And, looking back, I still agree with virtually everything I wrote. However, since this is a question that comes up fairly often I figured it was worth revisiting and discussing.

As I said back in the day, I believe that a necklace should ideally:

  1. NOT compete with the neckline of your top
  2. Fill the visible neck/chest area
  3. Or, in the case of closed necklines, create contrast

Let’s start with a scoopneck for our first example:

Simple neckline, simple necklace. This pairing adheres to the criteria listed above – necklace and neckline aren’t fighting each other and the necklace fills the space. Notice, too, that the scoopneck and chain mirror each others’ shapes. A pendant would have created a v-shape, but this unadorned chain is rounded just like the visible neckline. (Secondary, but something to consider.) read more

Originally posted 2012-12-19 06:08:52.

Proportion, Pant Rise, and History

One of the topics that comes up continually in my classes, lectures, and client sessions is top length. Specifically the idea that when it comes to untucked tops, shorter tops work better with skirts while longer tops work better with pants.

Let’s take a look at two figures:

Correct length for tops worn with skirts and pants

These guys illustrate what we’ve come to expect, proportion-wise, from skirt and pant outfits. Skirts tend to fall at the natural waist and we expect a shorter torso silhouette with them, either a tucked-and-belted look or an untucked top that hits about two fingers’ width below the navel. Pants waistbands generally fall lower on the body (unless they are high-waisted), and we expect a longer torso silhouette with them. Untucked tops that hit approximately three fingers’ width above the crotchpoint are harmonious with most pants. (These are approximations, of course. What works for YOUR figure will all depend on your proportions, curves, and fit preferences.) read more

Originally posted 2014-06-10 06:16:46.