Posts Tagged: wardrobe

Reader Request: Incorporating Oddballs

difficult to style clothes

Bubu e-mailed me this question:

My mother-in-law asked if I’d be interested in a leather jacket [then] she showed me a knee-length black leather a-line coat with a tie waist and a black fur (real? i think) collar. It fit me surprisingly well – a bit loose in the waist (though I can tighten it with the belt), good length, and, key for me, well-fitting in the shoulders. I said I would take it and I’m kind of tickled because it’s like nothing I own and nothing I would pick, or could afford to buy. Plus I know the fashion mags say accents of faux fur are big right now, and that’s not the kind of thing I would generally go for, but why not take that trend for a spin for free? READ MORE

Originally posted 2012-02-09 06:18:12.

Reader Request: Making Sense of “Must-have” Lists

style fashion must have list

Brenda popped this question into the suggestion box:

I’d like to hear more about how to use “the must have lists” of fashion as concepts instead of edicts. For example, I don’t wear black or white, so the LBD and the ubiquitous white shirt are never going to be in my closet.

Nearly every style guide includes a list of wardrobe staples, items that every fashionable woman simply MUST own. These garments and accessories are generally conservative, classic, and a bit dull … yet they are meant to form the foundation of every modern woman’s well-rounded wardrobe. READ MORE

Originally posted 2012-06-19 06:28:20.

What Closet Orphans Can Teach Us

leopardtunic_outfit with text

I got a lovely e-mail from reader Corinne, who said:

Your book also made me realize that maybe the key to clarifying and strengthening my personal style was in my “orphans.” Practically everything else I’ve read says to get rid of them because they’re outliers. However, reading your book it occurred to me that perhaps it’s the rest of the closet is what should go quietly into the background.

Which, of course, made me unspeakably happy. And made me realize that closet orphans are basically teaching moments waiting to happen. I mean, we loved them, we bought them, we longed to wear them … and yet we didn’t wear them. If we don’t examine what prompted those purchases and what prevented those wearings, are we not doomed to make those same mistakes again? READ MORE

Originally posted 2013-05-17 06:35:24.