Posts Tagged: shopping

Reader Request: How to Avoid Looking Dated

avoid looking dated

In a comment on this post about clothing details that read as young or old, reader Jane asked for some tips on how to avoid looking dated. Datedness is a social construct, of course, reinforced by a fashion industry that sells us new clothing based on our desire to look “current.” This means it is, in essence, bunk. But the same could be said of any dressing mores: They allow us to be expressive and visually communicative, but they’re all rooted in capitalism. It shouldn’t matter one whit if you’re wearing a blazer that was made 20 years ago, so long as it fits and is in good condition … but because of the value we place on youth and staying up-to-date on everything, it does matter. In some cases, it matters several whits. READ MORE

Originally posted 2015-06-04 06:59:19.

Reader Request: Retail Specialties


Several of you have e-mailed me with similar requests, but Galena popped this one into the suggestion box:

… posts similar to “insomniac sale picks” where you post different stores/websites you can find wardrobe staples or pieces you find yourself reaching for often (for example, a yellow cardigan, or good places to get colored belts, etc) – links to the specific pieces would be ideal, but even saying “this store is generally good for this sort of thing” would be a great narrowing-down for your readers. Speaking as someone with limited income, I would also LOVE to see posts on where you can get mid-quality but affordable pieces, or links included for cheaper options when you do posts similar to what I describe above (for instance, many of the “ISP” links are out of my price range, even on sale). READ MORE

Originally posted 2014-02-06 06:26:11.

What Closet Orphans Can Teach Us

leopardtunic_outfit with text

I got a lovely e-mail from reader Corinne, who said:

Your book also made me realize that maybe the key to clarifying and strengthening my personal style was in my “orphans.” Practically everything else I’ve read says to get rid of them because they’re outliers. However, reading your book it occurred to me that perhaps it’s the rest of the closet is what should go quietly into the background.

Which, of course, made me unspeakably happy. And made me realize that closet orphans are basically teaching moments waiting to happen. I mean, we loved them, we bought them, we longed to wear them … and yet we didn’t wear them. If we don’t examine what prompted those purchases and what prevented those wearings, are we not doomed to make those same mistakes again? READ MORE

Originally posted 2013-05-17 06:35:24.