Reader Request: Long Over Lean for Tall Women

tunics and leggings for tall women

Georg Sand Left this comment over on Facebook:

Would you be willing to augment this post [on long over lean for petites] for tall girls (where all our height is in our legs) that’s me and I love this silhouette too! I also, however, seem to constantly have proportion issues. Do the same rules apply?

And my response? But of course I’m willing! And I’ve called in another expert, everyone’s favorite tall tunic-wearer, Gracey of Fashion for Giants. I’m going to get the ball rolling with my own tips, and then hand the mic to Gracey to round us out. Here we go:

Length affects proportions

A tunic should cover your entire butt as well as your crotchpoint, and many women look best in a tunic that hits at mid-thigh level. However, if you are tall and your height is in your legs rather than your torso, a slightly longer tunic may balance you out a bit more. By covering more of your leg above the kneecap – which the observing eye believes is the midpoint of your leg – you visually shorten and balance your frame. It’s your call, of course, but if balancing your proportions is a figure-flattery priority try keeping your tunic length at least one hand’s width above your kneecap and/or at least two hands’ widths below your crotchpoint.

Boots complicate matters

This is true for all people wearing long-over-lean outfits, but for tall gals minding where your boots hit is especially tricky. Boots that end far below your kneecap give the impression of very long legs. Pair those short-ish boots with a tunic that hits high on the thigh and you’ll look leggy indeed. Nothing wrong with that, of course! But if you’re seeking to balance your leg length, a boot that hits just a couple of inches below the kneecap and a tunic that hits mid-thigh will help. Want to avoid the boot issue altogether? Choose a pair that matches the color of your leggings or skinnies. Yes, this is a technique that is often employed to create a long, unbroken leg line, but it also eliminates hard breaks to create a more unified silhouette.

Cropped bottoms are a great option

As you can see from the first two outfits pictured above, ankle length and cropped slim bottoms are wonderful in long-over-lean mixes on tall women. Even though this combination creates a nearly half-and-half figure division on Gracey, it just works. Her leg line is unbroken from tunic hem to pant hem which means fewer chunks. The cropped pant length visually shortens the overall leg line a bit, but that serves as a balancing factor here. Harder to do in winter, of course, but a fun option for warm weather.

In terms of comparison to the post on long-over-lean for petites, there is some overlap: Visually elongating your legs may not be a priority, but wearing like-colored leggings and footwear will prevent lots of distracting breaks in your figure. Being strategic about focus is always wise, and you can choose a statement necklace to draw the eye to your face or add a like-colored belt to your tunic to accentuate your waist without breaking up your lines. Low contrast layers are great to prevent loads of breaks in your figure line, but not as essential here as they are for someone who wants to look taller. “Don’t worry about it”? Always applicable to advice-y posts. If you prefer to just wear combos you love, you should do exactly that.

Now, let’s hear from Gracey:

Try prints and colors

Gracey from Fashion for Giants wears tunics over lean pants

Why try prints and colors? Mostly just because you can. As a tall person, you have a little more leeway when it comes to long over lean because you can ignore those guidelines that exist to help the less-tall avoid the often-stumpifying effects of long over lean. As Sally mentioned, low-contrast layers are exceedingly helpful to those who want to look taller, but if you’re already tall, you can wear contrasting prints and colors without much worry. Especially if you pay attention to the rest of the tips Sally laid out.

I will say that with printed and colored pieces, proportion matters more than with low-contrast pieces. In the first look, for example, the tunic is a bit long for the length of the pants.  And the ankle strap flats aren’t helping matters. But, in the second look, the longer pants help balance out the length of the top. And, of course, a nude or black flat would help even more but I am currently unable to resist the lure of a brightly colored shoe. Perhaps someday…

Make sure your lean is truly lean

Gracey of Fashion for Giants wears leggings, a white tunic, blue sweater and black flats

In this outfit, as with the leopard and yellow outfit above, I have a LOT of volume up top. Here I’m wearing an over-sized sweater layered over an over-sized shirt. It’s a lot, it really is. But, keeping the lean portion of the outfit truly lean helps balance that volume. That’s why when I wear my long-over-lean outfits I stick to skinny pants, skinny jeans, and leggings. Those bottoms tend to offset whatever nonsense layering I have going on up top. And that’s important because I tend to do a lot of nonsense layering.

Anyone else have tips or suggestions for wearing long-over-lean outfits as a tall person? Proportion preferences? Do you do boots with your outfits? What else would you tell Georg?

Images courtesy Fashion for Giants.

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Tote – J.W. Hulme

Wore this a couple of weekends ago when we drove down to Winona – birthplace and namesake of Ms. Ryder – to take in the fall color. We also swung through Red Wing  and a few other small towns. People, it was GORGEOUS. And although most of those leaves are gone by now, the ones behind me on the maple-lined block south of ours were downright stunning, too.

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**Disclosure: Actions you take from the hyperlinks within this blog post may yield commissions for alreadypretty.com. See Already Pretty’s disclosure statement for more details.

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