Reader Request: Smart vs. Pretty

Reader Judy sent me this request via e-mail:

One of my fellow engineering students made the comment that girls in engineering are either “hot” and dumb, or really smart, socially awkward, and “ugly.” Upon remembering that I am, indeed, a girl, he babbled something about a happy medium, but the meaning was nonetheless clear. Time spent with power tools can limit my skirt and dress wearing, but I like to believe that I can be perceived as a woman, even an attractive woman, and also as competent and intelligent. READ MORE

Originally posted 2011-08-09 06:22:31.

Reader Request: Styling Long Cardigans

Love the look of long cardigans but not sure how to make them work? This post has tips for making boyfriend and duster cardigans look fantastic!

Amanda e-mailed me this request:

I was wondering if you consider doing a blog post or offer some advice on styling long cardigans so they don’t look frumpy. I just bought my first one [and] it seemed like a good way to convert some of my summer dresses into fall or winter ensembles, and I see outfits with long cardis that I just love on other people. But I’m not sure what I think about making ti work for me. I’m on the tall side with a proportional curvy figure. The cardigan I bought is nice (and I love the belt that comes with it), but it has pockets that make it not lie super-flat over the hips. And basically it just didn’t look quite “right” when I tried it with some of the dresses I’d been thinking of. READ MORE

Originally posted 2012-02-21 06:11:10.

Necklaces and Necklines Revisited

necklaces necklines

Waaaaay back in 2009, I cooked up this tutorial on pairing necklaces and necklines. And, looking back, I still agree with virtually everything I wrote. However, since this is a question that comes up fairly often I figured it was worth revisiting and discussing.

As I said back in the day, I believe that a necklace should ideally:

  1. NOT compete with the neckline of your top
  2. Fill the visible neck/chest area
  3. Or, in the case of closed necklines, create contrast

Let’s start with a scoopneck for our first example:

Simple neckline, simple necklace. This pairing adheres to the criteria listed above – necklace and neckline aren’t fighting each other and the necklace fills the space. Notice, too, that the scoopneck and chain mirror each others’ shapes. A pendant would have created a v-shape, but this unadorned chain is rounded just like the visible neckline. (Secondary, but something to consider.) READ MORE

Originally posted 2012-12-19 06:08:52.