Posts Categorized: style

Already Prettypoll: Low Rise, Mid Rise, or High Rise?

I am a high rise girl TO THE END. My baguette-shaped lower tummy forces anything lower than natural waist to create some serious abdominal subdivisions. Like me, many clients and friends were scarred by the low-rise-only 90s, and rejoice that comfy, fabulous high rises are available to us once more.

But I know full well that high rises won’t work for everyone. If you carry your weight in your midsection and have narrow hips, a mid or low rise could be perfect. Depending on your torso and leg lengths, high rises may be uncomfortable and unflattering. It’s all down to personal preference and comfort.

How about you? Do you prefer a low rise, mid rise, or high rise on your pants and jeans? Why does this style work for you?

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Reader Request: Professional Style for Figures With Larger Hips

profession clothes pear shape

Reader Karin sent me this request via email:

I am a 43 year old woman returning to work after 10 years out raising children. I am looking to return to mid-level corporate management, so a fairly traditional atmosphere. I am a chubby pear. Bust size 12, waist size 14, hips size 16/18. The full skirts, tighter shirts combinations that are generally flattering on my figure look a little bit too “1950s Picnic,” for a corporate office. I just look dumpy in the sheath dresses and trouser/blouse combos that seem so of the moment.

An interesting conundrum, no? The styles that flatter Karin’s figure in traditional ways don’t look quite as professional as she’d like. But if she were to prioritize typical dress code expectations over figure-flattery, she might not look or feel her best either. She’s focusing on both figure balance and relative sartorial conservatism, so that’s how I’ll couch my advice. But it’s worth noting that women with pronounced hips can and should wear pencil skirts if they want to, even if said skirts emphasize their hips. Hips happen. Observers can deal with it. And, as always, none of my figure flattery advice posts should be considered gospel, including this one, and I fully expect you to read them with a grain of salt. Style “rules” are merely guidelines, no matter who is dispensing them. I trust you to use your judgment. And I trust you to take what applies to you, discard the rest, and assume positive intent.

Now, assuming creating balance and downplaying hips are both goals, here are a few tips:

Track down some a-line skirts

I couldn’t say why, but most available skirts and dresses seem to be slim pencils or pleated fulls. Which is bonkers since a-line shapes work beautifully for so many women. AND lots of vendors are mislabeling skirts as a-line when they’re really full – a true a-line creates the shape of a capital letter A, widening gradually from waistband to hem without pleats or gathers. The Calvin Klein skirt above is the right shape, and done up in suiting style fabrics that will work with blouses and/or blazers in corporate environments. It’s also available in sizes 14W – 24W here. But any skirt in that shape will glide over hips without clinging, yet look more professional than its full, pleated cousins. A-line dresses (like this one) are even harder to find, but also work well.

Mind your fibers

So I just kinda ragged on full skirts, I know, but it’s worth noting that a full skirt made from tropical wool will be far more office-friendly than one made of cotton poplin. It might still feel too casual or young for the boardroom, but could be fine for desk days. This tip also runs in the opposite direction: Casual materials like ponte can be made to feel more formal when done up in pencil skirt and blazer shapes, and since ponte has thickness and flexibility, it can be a great option for women with curves.

Opt for simple trousers

Flat front, pocket-free, mid-rise versions are fantastic, but top-entry pockets will do in a pinch. I agree with Angie that you should be sure to buy trousers that fit where you are largest (likely hips) and have them tailored elsewhere (waist and possibly legs depending on your build). Also that slight boot cuts and wide-legs will work best, worn with heels if elongating your legs is a priority. Straight leg styles can also work and look marvelously modern. If you feel like this style emphasizes your hips, pair them with bright or printed tops to focus visual attention upward. Speaking of which …

Add a little visual volume up top

Balancing a larger bottom half sometimes means adding some visual volume to your top half. I’m not talking chunky sweaters or oversized blouses as much as jackets with defined shoulders, ruffle-detail tops, and even statement necklaces. Nothing drastic, just detailing that makes your top half look subtly bigger, draws the eye upward, or both.

Look to office-wear brands

I’m thinking Calvin Klein, Jones New York, and Anne Klein, all of which offer office-friendly staples in regular and plus sizes. Check Amazon for all three brands, too. I keep an eye on this trio since many of my clients need classic office-wear, and I feel like they all provide more figure-friendly designs than Ann Taylor, J.Crew, Banana Republic, and other mid-market suiting/work-wear brands. Skirts aren’t super short or super tight, and tops are classic but with thoughtful details. JNY does blazers and jackets a bit better than the other two. Also check Talbots for office-friendly staples in regular, plus, petite, and petite plus sizes.

And, of course, befriending your tailor is a good idea. When your waist is dramatically smaller than your hips, pants will seldom fit right off the rack, and you may need to have jackets and blazers altered to work with your curves.

Other ladies with hips, what are your tips for professional dressing? Any brands or styles to recommend? Do you try to visually balance your lower half? What advice would you give Karin?

Images courtesy Amazon

**Disclosure: Actions you take from the hyperlinks within this blog post may yield commissions for alreadypretty.com. See Already Pretty’s disclosure statement for more details.

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Clothing Versus Body

clothing versus body

In college, I wore what my peers wore. I had a limited budget, limited resources, and limited interest in style so I just imitated what I saw. And what I saw was jeans, jeans, flannel, Doc Martens, jeans, oversized sweaters, jeans, long-sleeve tees and, jeans. Also jeans. And the jeans that were in style at the time were flares, which balanced my hips relatively well, and I wore them without thinking and assumed I looked as good as I  possibly could.

After graduation I moved to San Francisco where I traded my flare jeans for wide-leg black dress slacks. And, again, I wore them without thinking and assumed I looked as good as I possibly could.

It wasn’t until I moved to Minneapolis in 2000 and began exploring my personal style in earnest that I realized I didn’t look as good as I possibly could because I was wearing clothing that fought my body. Since I carry some squish right where low- and mid-rise pants hit, their waistbands were cutting into me even when they fit “properly,” and some muffinage was inevitable. I was wearing blocks of color that bisected me and drew attention to my butt and hips. I never, ever layered, instead opting for heavy, bulky single-ply tops and sweaters.

Skirts were a revelation: They sat at my natural waist where there was extremely limited waistband dig, they flowed gracefully over my hips, they FELT AMAZING. Learning to layer gave me a far more artful way to stay warm than just throwing on the thickest, heaviest sweater I owned and disguising everything about my body in the process. Once I started wearing clothing that worked with my figure instead of against it, once I stopped pitting my clothing against my body, I looked like a completely different woman. I felt so much more comfortable in my outfits. And my confidence skyrocketed.

Sometimes, wearing clothing that fights your body is unavoidable: If you must wear a uniform, if you dress for dirty or dangerous tasks you may end up in garments that work against your figure. But it’s also possible to simply default to clothing that fights your body, to wear it because you’re not sure what else to do, to stay within certain parameters and never explore beyond them. And you may not even realize you’re doing it. Here are some signs that you may be pitting your clothing against your body:

Pinching, pulling, and subdivision: This is one of the most obvious signs of clothing fighting a bod, but it merits mentioning. Clothing that works with your form will sit flat and quiet against you without cutting into you, dividing up your torso, or otherwise hurting your physical form. I know this can be an especially tough one depending on how you’re built. But if you can make a goal of finding and wear non-pinching clothing as often as possible, you’ll feel more comfortable and look sleeker.

Unexpected results: You see a garment on someone else, like the look, purchase the item, wear it, realize immediately that it looks utterly different on you than it did on your inspirational model, silently admit that it might not be a good style for you, yet continue to wear it. Now, there’s no “right” way to wear certain garments, but in this situation you can see that something is “off.” The look or looks you’re creating displease your own eye, but you’re stuck on the vision of how they look on other people.

Wardrobe malaise: If you either loathe everything in your closet or feel utterly indifferent to everything you own, it’s possible that you’re buying body-fighting garments. Exclusively. Nearly all people own a handful of items that make them look and feel utterly amazing. Everyone has the occasional, “I’ve got nothing to wear” moment, but if you suffer from a perpetual wardrobe malaise, you might want to reconsider some of your dressing choices.

If you feel like you might be in a clothing vs. body situation and don’t know where to begin making changes, try going drastic. If you’ve been wearing nothing but skirts for 10 years, try pants. Skinny pants, wide legged pants, flares, straight legs, any pants. If you’ve been doing loads of layers, pare down to a single layer of garments for a while. If you’ve been wearing low rise bottoms, try high waisted ones instead. Whatever you’re doing now, try the opposite. You’ll probably end up meandering back to a middle ground eventually, but starting out extreme will allow you to explore the gamut.

Finding clothing that caresses your body, flows with its natural curves and accents its natural angles can be extremely challenging. I don’t mean to imply that it’s a snap for anyone and everyone. But questing for garments that work with – instead of against – your body is a worthwhile project. Because once you find them, your confidence will skyrocket, too.

Images courtesy Gap.

**Disclosure: Actions you take from the hyperlinks within this blog post may yield commissions for alreadypretty.com. See Already Pretty’s disclosure statement for more details.

This is a refreshed and revived post from the archive.

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