Lovely Links: 6/20/14

On June 28 I’ll be doing a reading and signing at Eat My Words in Northeast Minneapolis! Join me at 2 p.m., won’t you?

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Weekly Kitten:

fridge cat

Every time I open the fridge. EVERY TIME. (First seen on Facebook.)

I’m thrilled to have been featured in Minnesota Monthly’s piece on Twin Cities style bloggers!

“‘Orange Is the New Black’ enters a landscape that labels non-thin bodies, at best, unattractive and, at worst, diseased, and inverts the resulting stereotypes with a slew of counterexamples … [The show offers] dozens of three-dimensional portrayals of women with bodies that fall outside the cultural norm. They all have complicated inner lives and diverse wants, goals and desires — both romantic and otherwise.”

Perhaps your luxury fiber of choice should be alpaca, not cashmere. Interesting points. (Thanks, Garrett!)

Fabulous and classy use of multiple neons. Kudos, Grown and Curvy Woman!

Brilliant on so many levels: 15 Lesser-Known Things To Say To A Dress

Yet another personal story highlighting how inappropriate it is to tell skinny and small people to eat more and/or judge them for their bodies.

Suzanne touches on the challenges of dressing when you have fibromyalgia, and also wonders why some bras look great on their own and awkward under clothing.

Here’s how the NYT describes the blog ladypockets:”This ‘ain’t it ridiculous we care about what power women wear, not what they do’ attitude is, as it happens, also being parodied in a new blog called ladypockets.com that uses the tropes of women’s mags to mock both the forms themselves and the idea that anyone should pay attention to such things.” (Cheers, Alison)

Two classic combos that never fail: Black and white polka dots with bold red shoes and gorgeous white blouse and stately black pants.

This week the U.S. Senate launched a panel on weight loss consumer fraud. Missouri Democrat Claire McCaskill is heading the investigation, and has already publicly scolded Dr. Oz for supporting “miracle in a bottle”-style weight loss remedies. Will be interested to see how this unfolds.

Kellie previews the Fall offerings from plus size line Carmakoma, and they are a fabulous mix of trendy and classic.

A woman who truly does not hate her own body explains three steps she took to growing into a positive body image. They might not work for you, but her journey is fascinating.

Great tips for picking sleeve style based on your own figure flattery priorities.

Thanks to Corporette for inviting me to guest post about what to wear for a presentation or TV appearance.

“Dawn Nadeau and Julie Kerwin are teaming up to offer boys and girls a play alternative that looks like a woman but not an object. Last month, they launched their own action figure company, IAmElemental, and have since raised over $160,000 on Kickstarter to jump-start a line of female action figures inspired by everyday “superpowers” like bravery, honesty, persistence, and fear.” (Cheers, Rachel!)

Totally stealing this outfit idea: Gingham shirt with tulle skirt and sparkly necklace. What a fun combo.

Color dictionaries were designed to give people around the world a common vocabulary to describe the colors of everything from rocks and flowers to stars, birds, and postage stamps.”

Erica looks utterly smashing in her cobalt blue short suit.

Wonderful advice on self-care and asking for what you need.

I would very much like to hang out with Grace Choi, who has built a 3D “printer” for makeup because she’s sick to death of the inherent racism of the cosmetics industry.

Reminder: It’s OK to wear fancy clothes for no reason.

Why do we insist on defining ourselves at the expense of another person or group? Is it a weird power dynamic or rather a pack mentality approach to dealing with a person or a group not the same as us? Maybe it’s just an inevitable consequence of all the media images we consume on a daily basis, which emphasize the ‘perfect’ body (which as we know doesn’t exist, see my previous post) that leads us to feel this need to defend ourselves by throwing one another under the proverbial bus.”

Adele is a hand model. She is also hilarious. Loved reading this interview with her about her profession.

It would make me unspeakably happy if Mia would lend me her Tom Waits necklace. Just sayin.

On the Fox 9 Morning Buzz this week we chatted about various ways to make the nautical look work for your tastes and figure.

I stumbled across Print All Over Me, this week, an online shop that provides simple white garments and accessories and allows you to upload your own images that will be digitally printed on them. You can also create your own fabric or buy items using prints that others have uploaded.

An all gray outfit is the perfect backdrop for punchy orange accessories.

A sobering reminder that pre-distressed denim is pretty awful for the environment. Consider thrifting some pre-loved jeans instead!

This one made my head spin: Reimagining Barbie: Villain or Victim?

“… we need to stop pretending that such-and-such is a feminist choice because feminism is about choice and if I’m a feminist then everything I do is automatically feminist. No. That’s not how it works. Wear dresses if you want to. Wear cute shoes and earrings and bright red lipstick. Shave off every hair on your body if that’s what feels right. But please recognize that you don’t do any of those things because you just happen to like doing them. ”

Queen Michelle reminds us that while it’s technically summer in Glasgow, that doesn’t mean it’s warm. Love her sheer black layers.

I fall on the side of being bold and brash in your self-declarations, but this take is interesting: Exactly how confident are you “allowed” to be?

Sad to say, but I agree: More strong female characters are showing up in Hollywood story lines, but they’re becoming tokens. And it’s aggravating.

Could writing help you move away from self-hatred and toward self-love and acceptance? It certainly helped Alex.

Watching Korean culture converge on a single ideal of beauty, Professor C.N. Le shows a process at work around the world. Sobering.

And from the brilliant team that brought you HelloFlo (Cheers Sarah):

  • Heather Harrell

    Not sure if you guys had these, but in the late 80’s early 90’s Eckerd had these distributed “teen” kits that pretty much were Hello Flo with deodorant and razors.

  • ballewal

    I have to wholeheartedly disagree that no women wear makeup or shave or whatever because they “just happen to like doing them.” I think discourse like this in feminism that in its very language creates a rift between groups of women is wholly damaging to women and the feminist movement. And of course, there are women who like to wear makeup or have hair-free bodies. And they’re not freakish or wrong and we should never treat them that way.

    • Grace McNamee Decker

      The post Sally shared in no way treated those who shave or wear makeup as wrong or freakish– the authors says SHE does those things! But doing those things isn’t a feminist act, in the way that NOT doing them might be.

      • ballewal

        I think we need to completely disengage “body modification” or lack thereof from feminism because it does us no favors. As I said before, it only creates a rift between women that does not help the cause at all.

        • Chelsea

          I wonder where or who is treating women who shave and wear makeup as freakish and wrong? She says that women who do those things (most women) do them because they have been taught to behave that way and are rewarded for doing them, so they end up liking them or at least being more comfortable if they do them. What part of that do you disagree with? I would argue that it is actually women who don’t shave who are treated as ‘freakish and wrong’.

  • Heather Harrell

    And on the other items:
    #1- As long as it’s not impractical, I will always choose a skirt/dress. they are significantly more comfortable to me, I don’t have to worry about heel height or awkward bunching and seaming or something not sitting right and ending up with camel toe. Plus in the summer- nothing breathes like a skirt! It really is one of the blessings about being a woman.
    #2 As ridiculous as it is that we judge professional women based on their garments of choice, failure to kindly reflect appropriately attired career women means that real every day women don’t know how to dress for work. While this blog is mocking in tone, it really can show a variety of professional ways to dress depending on your personality and career.
    #3-Barbie hasn’t always been the anti feminist icon she is today. She’s been modeled after multiple impressive career strands, too. Yes,her current build is based on an adult toy shop doll, but in this case we also have to remember- she’s a fashion doll. Her build allowed for the bulk of seams and fastenings at waist and neck. Maybe instead of focusing so strongly on rebuilding her physically, we should encourage Mattell to focus on career dolls in professions that have low female participation.

  • http://thelifeandtimesofsam.wordpress.com Sam M

    That HelloFlo ad is on point. Oh my god, I can’t stop laughing. Talk about brilliant advertising! I shared the link on Facebook, and my friends love it too. Thanks for the great round-up, as always.

    – Sam

  • Karo

    Great Links! Love the all grey outfit.

    Handle with Karo

  • Cassie

    So you named her after Harriet the Spy, right? Watch out if you ever get a dumbwaiter.

  • RAR Roueche

    I must say, I don’t really “get” all the articles I’ve read linking playing with Barbies to having poor self-image as a girl. My sisters and I played with Barbies for years and years, and never negatively compared ourselves to them. Or compared at all. They were toys, and we played with them (though I did find it odd that horse-riding Barbie’s legs were SO long compared to the horses. Her feet reached to the horses’ knees, for goodness’ sake.)

    Personally, I think girls have to be taught that there is only one ideal body type, that thinness and long legs are the goal. We were never exposed to fashion magazines, TV shows, most movies and popular culture in general (I know I know, I grew up under a rock). I have no doubt that many girls HAVE come away with negative self-images based on Barbie because they were already “trained” to look for it. It’s not solely Barbie’s fault, though I am all for making her more realistic.

  • Suzanne Carillo

    That Hello Flo made me laugh so hard!

    Thanks for sharing and thanks for including me and my prickly pair in your links : )

    bisous
    Suzanne