Lovely Links: 12/14/12

I’m THRILLED to announce that I’ll be working as a Guest Stylist for ARC’s Value Village once a month! Just did my first appointment on Monday – with lovely reader M – and had a blast picking out goodies for her to try and styling outfits together. My next appointments are January 14 at 2:15 p.m., and February 11 at 2:15 p.m. at the Brooklyn Center store. For up-to-date information about the program, follow the ARC’s Value Village Personal Shopper Facebook page. If you’d like to book an appointment with me, e-mail Head Stylist Michelle Dustin at [email protected].

I recently had a client fly out to Minneapolis from the Southwest to work with me, and asked her to write a little about her experience! Read about JW’s consult and style journey here.

There’s still time to order up my book in time for the holidays! (Also available at I Like You in Minneapolis and Garrison Keillor’s Common Good Books in St. Paul )

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Fashionista highlights 10 brands that are committed to “slow fashion,” and doing it well. (Via YLF)

Dalmation-print dress and spiky collar necklace? Yes please.

These 10 fun facts about the gowns of Queen Elizabeth I are simply fascinating.

Check out this interview with body positive advocate and radiant fashionista Franceta of Frantic Dreams.

“Treating my body better has become easier as I think about myself in a less negative manner. I now know that my body is not something I should mistreat just because I am unhappy with its appearance. It is my responsibility to decide the best way to care for myself and to take initiative when I notice that my body is in need of something.”

Sarah shows us two marvelous ways to pair black and red.

Have you seen any items go from wardrobe workhorse to closet orphan in a single year? This post offers some possible explanations for this phenomenon.

Casey Legler is a woman who works as a model. A male model.

Pantone has declared emerald green the color of 2013. Check out these great cheat sheets for pairings with emerald green.

Sometimes, summer clothes transition beautifully into winter wear. Don’t fear bright colors, friends!

Find out what 13 people wore to interview with Anna Wintour. And if they got the jobs.

Patti has a good chuckle at a “study” that says 59 is the age women should stop wearing red lipstick and at 41 the need to get rid of all their miniskirts. Wendy weighs in, too.

Super Kawaii Mama fuses the 1980s and 1940s in one kick-ass outfit. Double vintage goodness.

“I’ve always been ambivalent about our culture’s obsession with makeovers. On the one hand, so often the implication is that there’s something wrong with us…with our style, our hair, our makeup, or even our bodies themselves that need “fixing.” A pervasive Self-Improvement culture can sometimes let us forget that we are already just fine, right now, as we are.”

Orange is such an energetic color. Love this outfit that includes several shades.

Absolutely adore this guide to pairing necklines and scarf ties, with a little tutorial video for each!

Catherine should probably just send me her slouchy black suede boots right now. I mean, really.

Quick reminder: Stretch marks do not constitute a “serious health issue.” (Post not safe for work viewing.)

Amazing. Hourglassy shows us – with helpful photos – how handbag size and shape can impact silhouette, especially on a busty frame.

If you’re wondering which styles of jeans are appropriate for a business casual environment, this post is for you!

“The harshest critics of my childhood and adolescence were other Asian Americans and Asians. When someone white, or other people of color, belittled me, my responses ranged from exasperation to rage, but overall I was able to utilize those emotions to defend myself. When one of your own – however expansively you use that term – looks you up and down and deems you unworthy, though, what you feel is an acute sense of guilt and betrayal.” (Via Thick Dumpling Skin)

Weesha’s looking super stylish in her purple suede platform wedges.

This interview with the author of Airbrushed Nation gives us a peek inside women’s magazines.

Quiz time: Do you know your dress silhouettes?

This piece explores the interplay and conflicts between feminism and faith, and interviews several women who felt it was important to find a way to embrace both.

“When I tried on that beautiful blue plaid dress, the stage was set for a body-hating bonanza. I mean, it really did look horrific on me, and perhaps if I had longer legs, smaller boobs, slimmer shoulders, and a drastically different waistline, it would have looked amazing. But something had shifted in my way of thinking, because instead of berating my body for not fitting the dress, I realized that the dress didn’t fit my body, and I moved on.”

Over at the StarTribune, I offered five ways to spice up your little black dress looks for holiday festivities.

And from the Department of Random: Awwww, sad trombone. (Via Jen Larsen)

Additionally: Jedi hamster

  • http://readinginskirts.wordpress.com Mia

    I have a necklace from Erica Weiner (one of the brands mentioned in the “slow fashion” article), and I adore it:

    http://readinginskirts.wordpress.com/2012/10/15/outfit-post-101012/

    Good to see the brand vetted as reputable!

  • http://wendybrandes.com/blog/ WendyB

    Thanks for the link!

  • http://notdeadyetstyle.blogspot.com/ Patti @ NotDeadYet Style

    Thanks for the shout-out Sal! And I may have to scrap with you for Catherine’s black boots : >

  • http://youlookfab.com/ angie

    Thanks for the shout out!

  • b.

    I’m so psyched to learn more about your VV personal shopper gig! Alas, that fb link doesn’t seem to work?

  • http://filasewphie.blogspot.com Sophie

    I have a question that I’ve always wondered about people who identify with a major religion, but disagree with some of its core moral teachings: Why? Why would you identify yourself as a Catholic if you don’t agree with it on abortion, gay marriage, contraception, and so on? Why not go join a more liberal version of Christianity? I’m sure there’s a reason, but I don’t know what it is.

    • Jennifer

      It’s a bit hypocritical, to be sure, but here’s my answer. I grew up in a Southern Baptist church. A very conservative Southern Baptist church, where I still attend. They don’t believe in women deacons, definitely not women pastors, or gay marriage, or abortion, or basically most of the the Democratic party platforms. And I’m a moderate Democrat who believes in all of the above, save abortion. But there are good people there. People I’ve known all my life, and understand me and my quirks, and my shyness, and who were understanding and loving and I know prayed and visited and called and sent donations and gifts and meals when my father was battling leukemia. Now I’m not saying I’m staying there because I feel guilt or a sense of beholdedness, but these are my people, even if we don’t agree on some core concepts.

  • Miss T

    I’m thrilled to see emerald green “back”. I only hope that manufacturers actually make clothes in that deep, saturated emerald color, instead of the anemic teal-ish versions that typically floods the market. People seem to be timid about dressing in green; not sure why that is. Emerald green, especially, is such a versatile and flattering color and people forget that you don’t have to dress head-to-toe in it, you can wear emerald green shoes, or wear faux emerald crystal earrings, or a deep green velvet skirt, or a sheer emerald green blouse. To me, emerald green is an exciting, almost magical color that add sophistication and depth to any outfit.

  • Miss T

    About the story of the beautiful dress that didn’t fit and blaming the dress, not the body, I had a funny thought after I read it: it occurs to me that I would be more inclined to “blame” my body if just ONE part of the body didn’t fit — e.g., the hips or the bust or whatever. However, if the hips AND the bust don’t fit AND the cutout in back is gaping, AND the length is all wrong, well, then obviously it’s the dress! :D I think this is because the more common experience is to have a garment be aaaaalmost perfect — except for one part of it you just cannot make work. Which sort of leads to a reflexive blaming one’s self for the “one” fatal body “flaw” that keeps you from the garment you love.

  • http://wardrobeoxygen.com Alison

    Thank you for the mention, dear Sal! And also thank you for all your fabulous links to entertain me this weekend!