Lovely Links: 11/30/12

Lindy describes the challenges and pains of being a fat person at the gym. She also mentions this equally fabulous article on the same topic.

“The more we live out the life we’re meant to, the less power the old crappy recordings have over us. Our actions start to trump them. They speak louder than any words ever will, and eventually, the tape will turn from an audio recording into a video recording. It will be documented proof that you aren’t what the bullies said. Or what your parents said. Or what the ads say.” (Cheers, Mariah)

Jessica is breathtaking in this party-ready ensemble. Lace and tulle! Lovely!

I still think “rules” about when and why you should get rid of or keep certain items of clothing should be bent and broken on a case-by-case basis, but this unf**k your closet flowchart is a great place to start.

Over at the Huffington Post, I wrote about why fashion-related judgment can be damaging and is unnecessary.

Turns out Canadian retailer Reitmans is yet another resource for standard, plus, petite, AND petite plus sizes!  (Thanks, Joanna!)

Autumn examines the relationship between beauty and betrayal.

Whoa. Fifteen ways to lace up your shoes.

A great reminder that you can make amazing progress in your own body image journey if you focus on what your body can do instead of comparing it to an arbitrary beauty standard.

This necklace/neckline cheat sheet offers some great ideas! (Also see my older post, Necklaces and Necklines.)

Love bows? This simple DIY tutorial shows how to make them to wear as ties, hair ornaments, shoe embellishments, and more.

And speaking of bows, I adore how Futurelint has styled hers in a plaid and polka-dot mix.

I gave my two cents on sequined dresses for every body type over at the Huffington Post.

Girl with Curves shares her wardrobe essentials. Her style is classic, and her picks are, too.

“As we age, the issues with our hair increase. Girls with curly hair iron their tresses into fried submission. Girls with straight hair will undergo stinky, burning perms to encourage their stick-straight locks to curl. The grass is always greener on the other side of the hairbrush it seems.”

Still trying to puzzle out how Kristy tied her scarf. LOVE.

Swing by the Already Pretty Facebook page for sale and shopping tips, fun conversations, shared resources, and, of course, cat photos.

Peter asks a question that sparks a lively debate: Is home sewing intrinsically more creative than shopping for ready-to-wear?

This post rounds up some affordable winter work clothing options, and even includes a sample capsule wardrobe.

Could military style clothing and garments with military influence be another form of appropriation? Fascinating question.

Ashe offers a few picks for cocktail and black tie dresses for plus-sized women.

Matchymatchycouples.com is adorable. Admit it. (Via Final Fashion)

Wow. My Pretty Learning Purse teaches infant girls to play with eyeshadow and lipstick stand-ins. That’s right, INFANT girls.

Moody Girl styles a bold polka dot sweater for work, and looks fabulous doing it.

Speaking on her experience with alopecia areata, Wornette says, “In pop culture women are expected not to have hair on their legs, their armpits, or their pubic areas, but the head is supposed to be full of lustrous locks flowing in the wind. Being a bald woman and embracing it was just another way of flipping a proud middle finger to the rigid constraints of accepted commercial taste.” (Via The Beheld)

  • http://www.meganmaedaily.com/ Megan Mae

    Omg matchymatch couples! My husband manages to copy me all the time. Either borrowing my color scheme or flip flopping it.

  • http://pacificrain.blogspot.com sarah

    your first link, on being fat at the gym, reminded me why I’m SO glad I’m at University and have the University gym at my disposal. I tried, once or twice, when I was out of school, to find a non-academic-gym to use. It was awful. I felt awkward – the walls were always covered in photos of super-sleek tanned people baring a ton of skin, the sound systems always seemed to be baring 80s pop rock, everything felt like a skeazy meat market. Ugh.

    Honestly, a lot of my colleagues in my Ph.D. program don’t like using our university’s gym because they don’t want to run into their students, but I love it. Your students aren’t objectifying you. Usually they’re surprised and excited to find out that you have an activity in common. I can’t imagine ever finding a private gym that felt this comfortable (NOR one where it is normal to bring your library books for your workout!)

    • Laurinda

      I remember a University gym that had a separate locker room for faculty. Always seemed a bit elitist to me.

  • K

    I can tell you how Kristy tied her scarf, but *warning* it requires a really long scarf. First she folded it in the middle (you’ll notice that one of her end pieces is tucked inside the “loop” that is really the middle of the folded over). Then she wrapped it around her neck (pretty typical here–basically what many of us do to tie a scarf anyhow). Next she took the ends of the scarf and began winding them around the loops around her neck, kind of like the way that a stripe goes up a barber poll or around a candy cane. She keeps winding it around the original layer until she gets all the way around to the beginning again. Then she tucks one end into the loop from the middle and flops the second over. Voila’!

    • AnnR

      Agreed, when I saw she credited it as from India then I assumed it was much longer than what we usually buy here.

  • Miss T

    I think it’s an overreaction about the beauty toys. Infants cannot be “taught” to use beauty products. These are just novelty toys that are more for the parents amusement than for indoctrination of an infant (if that were even possible, which it’s not). As a parent myself, I can assure you that kids love to imitate what their parents are *doing*. They don’t necessarily ascribe meaning to it, and certainly not sociological meaning.

    • http://www.rabidchiapet.com Amber

      I chuckled when I saw that link, because I gave that exact purse to a girl as a birthday present three or four years ago.

  • BarbaraL

    Kristy’s scarf is not actually tied! Cross the scarf ends behind your neck, then wind each end clockwise around the loop in front; at the bottom of the loop, each end is loose. I learned this by noticing a coworker adjusting her more loosely wrapped scarf. A simple, lovely look.

  • http://notdeadyetstyle.blogspot.com/ Patti @ NotDeadYet Style

    The neckline/necklace cheat sheet is awesome!

  • Cass

    In terms of sewing vs. shopping, both can be creative, and both can be uninspired and boring. You can pick a random black fabric, grab a pattern, and do nothing but connect the dots in sewing. You can grab jeans and a tee, or a track suit, or a real suit, off the rack when shopping and wear as-is with no accessories. There’s little creative about either. But you can get creative with both.

    I’d analogize to music or perhaps poetry. Fugue, for example, has incredibly strict rules. But to say that someone like Bach was not fantastically creative because he followed those rules rather than going free-form would be absurd. Likewise, constraining yourself to a certain rhyme scheme or to a particular meter does not prevent you from being creative. In some sense, forcing yourself to work within defined constraints to get where you need to go exercises different creative “muscles” than going free-verse. It is creatively challenging both to start with nothing and chart your own course and to start with strict rules and plot your own way through them to achieve your goal. Both can be dull and uninspired, and both can be innovative and creative, and I wouldn’t say that one is more of either of those things than the other.

  • Joules

    …Most of matchmycouples is just of people wearing coats and jeans.. If you exclude the two couples that were clearly doing sporting activities and the ones simply wearing matching coats there were very few authentically matching couples.

  • Moira

    re: the wardrobe essentials link — I love, love, LOVE the look of the Gwynnie Bee clothes! But, while I’m curvy, I’m a size 8, which means Gwynnie Bee won’t work for me. Can anyone tell me where to find items like some of those she features, most particularly that wrap dress?

    (Lately I’ve been seeing a LOT of really cute, well-structured dresses for plus size curvy girls but have not been able to find similar styles in standard sizes.)

  • http://pullyoursoxup.blogspot.com.au Desiree

    Ahhhhh bows, the bigger the better, I can never get enough of them! Thank you so much for sharing these fabulous links sweetie:) xoxo

  • Chris

    Sally,

    Thank you for the fashion judgement article at Huffington Post. I wish there were more people with your attitude. It would be a better world.

  • http://allonsee.wordpress.com Heather

    I am afraid to reply to Lindy directly, but after reading a few beautiful posts along a similar vein I finally decided to respond on my own blog. http://allonsee.wordpress.com/2012/12/02/i-never-know-what-to-do/

  • Laurinda

    Lindy & Emily are going to the wrong gyms. My “athletic club” has all ages/sizes/abilities, everyone is welcome and encouraged.

  • http://malepatternboldness.com Peter

    Thanks for the link, Sal. Your Friday link page is always one of the highlights of my week!

  • BelindieG

    I think most people at the gym are thinking about their own shortcomings and not obsessing on someone else on the treadmill next to them.