Guest Post: Five Easy Beauty Tips

Today’s guest post comes from the incomparable Sarah Von of Yes and Yes. You ARE reading Yes and Yes, aren’t you? Sarah covers everything from travel tips to intriguing interviews to advice on how to be a grown-up. But today, she’s sharing a few of her favorite, easy beauty tips. Enjoy!

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I’m not sure that I would consider myself a beauty expert. I don’t know how to pluck my eyebrows, my morning routine takes all of 15 minutes and I frequently forget to wear deodorant (don’t worry – I’m freakishly non-smelly. Probably because I’m part robot.) But! I do have a few tricks up my sleeve, tricks that keep my beauty budget low and keep getting me carded even though I’m quite a few years away from 21.

The Aspirin Mask

Did you know that aspirin contains heaps of salicylic acid – the main ingredient in most acne fighting products? To make this mask, all you need is a big ol bottle of dollar store aspirin (seriously? cheap, uncoated aspirin is better) a dallop of yogurt and a bit of honey. In a little bowl, crush 4 – 8 aspirin – the oilier your skin, the more aspirin you’ll want to use. Add about a tablespoon of yogurt and a tiny squirt of honey. You’ll want to use more honey if your skin is dry. Mix it all together till it’s grainy and spread it onto the oily parts of your face. I usually leave mine on for about five minutes, but you might want to start with a shorter amount of time. Wash it off and feel smug about your glowing skin, all to the tune of three cents.

Olive Oil as Shaving Cream

Instead of using Skintimate or your conditioner, use your bottle of Bertolli. Just spread it on your legs the way you would any other shaving product and have at it. It can get a bit messy – you’ll have to clean your razor a bit better than usual and make sure you clean your tub afterwards so you don’t slip in any left over oil, but I promise you that your legs will be smoother and stay moisturized longer than with anything else you’ve ever tried!

No More Razor Rash

Whenever I shave or wax any of those tender bits so prone to red bumplies, I do it before I go to bed and then top off the area with a generous slather of triple anti-biotic ointment. I let them spend the night au naturale (so stop wearing high cut tank tops after you shave your armpits!) and in the morning everything’s hair and razor rash free!

Homemade Exfoliator

If I’m running low on my beloved St. Ives Apricot Scrub, or winter has made my skin too tender for all that, I exfoliate my face with tablespoon of baking soda. It’s super cheap, works wonders, is gentle enough to use in the depths of December. Clever!

Lip Balm as Cuticle Cream

You know when you’re applying lip balm? And you find yourself stuck with a lone Sticky Finger? And then where do you wipe it? A while ago, I decided to stop wiping it on a) the inside of my pant’s hem (?!) b) my desk chair and start massaging that extra bit of balm into my cuticles. To birds! One stone!

What are you beauty secrets? Do share!

Image courtesy WetBehindtheEars.

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  • My biggest beauty secret is literally to just drink smoothies endlessly. Works brilliantly x

  • I’m not much of a lipstick girl but I love lip balms and I make mine as follows. I take a quantity of pure vaseline and add drops of liquid lipstick and mix it with a toothpick until I get the desirable color . I keep it in an old lip balm box and apply frequently. It’s cheap and makes my lips soft.

  • Anna

    Exfoliator—baking powder or baking soda? The latter is often recommended as an exfoliator, and I have found it effective. Can’t imagine using baking powder, though.

  • I use hair conditioner for shaving my legs – very smooth and not terribly messy. Thanks so much for the tips Sarah!

  • Olive oil for your hair. Especially for curly hair or dry hair. As a white, western woman it felt horribly counter-intuitive, but it’s amazingly helpful. At least once a week, use olive oil and leave on for a few hours or overnight, depending on how dry your hair is. Then wash out, it completely helps with frizz and dryness.

    Only problem is smelling the olive oil usually makes me crave pizza.

  • Kristi

    I am pretty sure the author meant baking soda for the exfoliator. I use it 3x / week and follow up with a honey mask.

  • These are such good tips. I love using products on hand at home for other purposes…I always feel like I’m getting so much use out of everything! 🙂

  • Anna

    I have to admit to still going store-bought on most of my beauty products, but I do really like the No Nonsense Daily Scrub from Crunchy Betty. It’s equal parts ground up oatmeal and ground up almonds, then when you want to use a bit of it you can turn it into a paste with water, or you can add milk and honey. It feels really good, and if you have extra you can eat it.

    http://www.crunchybetty.com/no-nonsense-daily-scrub-for-any-skin-type

    Also, a question: Do aspirin masks do anything for stubborn white heads? That is pretty much the only kind of ‘zit’ I ever get, and while I don’t mind them too much, they do occasionally blossom into those horribly painful subterranean puss filled monsters that you can’t really do anything about except hot compress them.

  • Love this topic!

    I use almond and jojoba oil for everything head to toe: hair conditioner, makeup removal, face and body cream, shaving cream, a base for any hair or body treatments I want to whip up (from kitchen ingredients of course!) A little goes a long way.

    Here are some other things I picked up, mostly from my mom:

    – After you crack an egg, put what’s left inside the shell straight onto your face and leave it for a bit. It’s protein!

    – After you juice a lemon, rub the leftover peel on elbows to lighten and soften the skin. Or rub it on nails to brighten them.

    – Bite your lips or presses them together for a few seconds for some quick colour.

    – Rub some used coffee grounds onto hands to exfoliate.

  • Sal

    Checked with Sarah, and you’re right: Baking SODA! Changed the post.

  • Lorena

    Oh that aspirin mask is totally eye opening… i had never heard of it and i can imagine it works like magic.

  • yayyy Sarah! she’s awesome!

  • GingerR

    Some people are sensitive to the antibotic cream applied on bigger patches of skin. If it doesn’t give the desired result consider that you may be one of them.

  • Anon

    Folks should be aware, regarding the aspirin mask, that it is possible to absorb enough aspirin through the skin to have salicylate toxicity (and before that point, other pharmacologic effects of aspirin- such as decreased clotting).

    • Anon

      Ah, I was wondering about that. Also, re: triple antibiotic ointment.

      Every tube I’ve seen of the stuff warns not to use it over a large area. So, depending on what you believe they consider a “large area” to be, it might not be the answer you seek for your red bumps after shaving.

  • I want to remember the exfoliator tip!

  • I loved this post, huge fan of Yes & Yes! Also, my “tip” is with what else: Olive Oil! It is my favorite liquid with which to remove eye make-up 🙂 Just put a little drop on a cotton ball and not only does it moisturize your eyes, but anything, even the toughest Amy Winehouse-like eyeliner will come right off! Enjoy 🙂

  • Stina

    Olive oil as makeup remover.

  • Don’t forget that salicylic acid makes the skin sensitive to the sun — so avoid it in the summer, and always follow up with SPF — unless you like getting discolorations.

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  • Very refreshing blog and very refreshing ideas. Im glad that I came across this when I did. I love what you’ve got to say and the way you say it.

  • Wow, your tips were great. I never knew those stuffs that can be found in my home may be used for my beauty regimen. I have pimple breakouts and I hope to try the aspirin mask recipe that you imparted.

  • That is really a good post. You made some really good points and I am grateful for your research. This information helps all of us to get rid from dark spots and skin problems.