Lovely Links: 4/20/12

Say! If you’re a Twin Cities reader and free this Saturday evening, come join me for a meet-up with the folks behind the amazing blog, Sociological Images. We’ll be at Town Hall from 6 p.m. – 8 p.m., chatting, drinking, and (hopefully) eating. I plan to be there at 6 p.m., so come on down!

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Check out this roundup of sites and shops that sell stylish clothes for curvy and plus-sized women. There were a few in there that I hadn’t heard of!

Cynthia looks sharp in a different kind of animal print.

“I am not a body issue free zone, and neither are any other of the supposedly ideally sized women that I know. In fact I have never met a woman who could stand up straight and declare, without embarrassment, that she liked her body. And I find that ineffably sad.” (Via For Those About to Shop)

Never enough polka dots. Especially in funky, retro-tinged ensembles like this one.

In a red and puffy post-brow-threading state, I ran into the gorgeous and gracious Christine at Blink earlier this week, and am now super excited to follow her new blog, Confetti in Her Hair.

I contributed a post to BlogHer’s style section on five ways to avoid the frump.

Autumn shares her thoughts on body hair, social pressures, and feminism in response to my post from earlier this week.

I love long layers of all types, but long colorful layers? My favorites.

And speaking of color, clearly Elisa Nalin belongs on my list of color heros.

“Ultimately, it is not the style rules that matter.  It’s our willingness to really project how and who we are in the world in a way that has meaning to us.”

Pashteit has a fabulous flair for retro-influenced outfits. Yes, I’m crushing on her. It’s true.

I know I’ve been flogging them a lot lately, but I’m totally addicted to the Stuff You Should Know podcasts and this one on the Zoot Suit Riots was fascinating.

Over at The Frisky I wrote a bit about my choice to be a lifelong teetotaler, and the reactions this choice sometimes provokes.

This gorgeous ensemble makes me wish I had the chutzpah to do a hat and gloves for daily wear.

More evidence illustrating that healthy lifestyle habits are more important than weight in determining overall health and premature death.

Chelsea steps outside her comfort zone to rock some colorful tights.

Sometimes the philosophy of “make it work” is incredibly counterproductive. Alison explains when you might want to just flick it in and donate instead.

Thanks to Fly, I’m now enamored of Ose, an online shop offering vintage and reconstructed vintage pieces in size 12 -22. YES!

It’s official: I want every single dress in Lilli’s closet.

A German artist turned composite images of “ideal” female facial features into these unnerving masks as a means of illustrating that artificially produced beauty isn’t always beautiful. Thoughts?

My girl Sarah interviewed me for Yes and Yes! Find out some fun and random facts about me and my fashion history.

I don’t doubt that there are some super awesome Physical Education teachers out there, but my experience in PE was pretty similar to Cynthia’s. Especially in terms of those fitness tests.

There’s still time to sign up for my community ed class, Learning to Dress Your Best!

  • Tina

    Love, love, love your post on being a teetotaler. Thanks, Sally!

    • http://www.gray-skies.blogspot.com/ Stacey

      I came to the comments to say the same thing – I loved that teetotaler article and thought it was very well-written.

    • Cindy

      Agreed!

  • http://pashteit.blogspot.com/ Pashteit

    Thank you so much for including me in this roundup and for your kind words, it really means a lot to me! :)

  • http://blogs.psychcentral.com/weightless/ Margarita @ Weightless

    Thanks so much for including my post on curvy clothing! I hope readers find it helpful.

    I also LOVE your piece in The Frisky. Like all your other writing, it’s eloquent, articulate and thought-provoking.

    Have a great weekend. :)

  • http://www.smartypantalons.com Cherri Porter

    I’m feeling ambivalent about my body. Although I realize our culture sends dangerous and aggressive messages about women’s bodies, I don’t want to jump on the “I Love My Body” bandwagon. I appreciate what mine can do, I bemoan what it can’t and I don’t feel the need to get all worked up about it. I think there needs to be room in the conversation about body to not really worry about it.

  • http://notdeadyetstyle.blogspot.com/ Patti @ NotDeadYet Style

    Thanks for including my post, Sal! I really loved the double polka dots on Stylish Thought’s blog. And your essay about choosing to not-drink is terrific.

  • http://mcphersonbonilla.blogspot.com/ Eden

    Another great line up. This is a weekly treat for me.

    Your teetotaller article was great. We chose not to serve alcohol at our wedding out of respect for some recovering alcholics in my family. A few guests were puzzled, but the manager of the reception site totally backed us up and when pressed about Why, he simply said “because it’s not your wedding”. We had a great time and the dancefloor was full. We saved a bundle and weren’t responsible for anyone relapsing.

    My only regret with this week’s Lovely Links… the Department of Random appears to be closed. Sad face.

    • http://www.alreadypretty.com Sal

      Not closed, just haven’t found anything worthy recently!

  • http://a.k.a.chymecindy.net Chymecindy

    So much links. Thanks for sharing. I’m going to check them…

  • Anat

    Re your bit for the frisky – I am a childfree woman, and I was astounded by the similarities between living with the choice not to drink and the decision not to become a parent. I loved the bottom line about personal decisions having no bearing on other people’s lives. What a great piece!!

    • Thursday

      I totally get the child-free thing – I’m 26, and when I say I don’t want children, I am often met with a response of, “Oh, don’t you worry, you’ll change your mind” or a puzzled look as if they can’t comprehend why I would possibly decide such a thing. Maybe I will change my mind, I reserve the right to make such decisions for myself, but they don’t seem to comprehend how insulting such a stance is to me, to imply that 1) the decision is not mine, but subject to my biology and 2) I cannot have a fulfilling and valid life as a woman without having children. In general, it is more readily accepted that my partner and I don’t intend to marry, so why is this such an issue for so many? /end rant

      Thanks for the link for Pashteit, she is one stylish woman!

  • Beth

    Thank you for the post about being a non-drinker! I’ll take a sip of wine or two with a fancy meal, but other than that, I don’t drink because I just don’t like alcohol. I, too, have noticed that this really bothers some people and sometimes I even get a vague uneasy feeling like I’m not a real grownup, since drinking seems so important to some people. It’s nice to know I’m not alone.

  • Wendy

    Thanks for your article about being teetotal. I do drink, but often experience pressure to drink more than I want to. If we are buying rounds there are people who will always buy me a large alcoholic drink no matter what I asked for. I like to have a single drink and feel a little bit relaxed, but I really don’t enjoy the feeling of being drunk and out of control. This is as threatening to certain people as not drinking at all. And it really has nothing to do with them. I’m just trying to enjoy my evening.

  • Anonymous

    Excellent article on teetotaling. I am almost an abstainer, not for any religious or ideological reasons but as a matter of taste and personal preference (not to mention finances).

    I was surprised not to find any mention in the Frisky comments about being considerate of recovering alcoholics. One should never out an AA member; that is for the individual to do when ready, but it’s good to keep that possibility silently in mind and not make remarks. A few years ago when I offered a friend a sip of my drink, he said casually, “No thanks,” and I accepted that just as casually without giving it another thought — until I remembered it much later, when he told me he has been in AA for many years, clean and sober for all that time despite the recurring struggle. I respect that hugely and now appreciate even more his low-key response to my offer of a sip.

  • http://stylecrone.com The Style Crone

    Thank you Sal, for the inclusion in your Friday Lovely Links. I always find new and interesting blogs in you not to be missed weekly roundup!

  • Kellie

    Thanks for including the sites and shops that offer plus-size styles. I followed a link and BAM…I have three gorgeous new silk blouses!

  • Amy Beans

    Love the links, especially to Pashteit!

  • Mandy

    This is my fave lovely links ever, and I always read your links.
    Three articles were very interesting to me, one, the teetotal one you wrote. I’m stunned that people react so much! I’ve been both a teetotaler and a drinker, and as a single mum in my earlier days just couldn’t afford to drink and catch a cab a lot of the time… And I wouldn’t ever get the hassles you do. I could party sober with drinkers and nothing would be said, even if I went to a club. I’m sorry people aren’t more accepting. None of my friends would ever bother you !
    Two, I loved the body hair one. I feel cleaner, myself hair free from the neck down, but don’t consider it a big deal either way.
    I used to rock the hairy bush, but went hairless in my late 20s and have never looked back.
    I prefer the ease of cleanliness, and I have a sensitive sense of smell.
    I don’t think it looks childlike- there’s nothing infantile about my lady parts, hair or no.
    My husband man scapes as well- has hairy armpits but I’ve never seen him with chest hair, or down below… It’s unusual over here for a man to do it, but there’s a lot to like ;-)
    The last one I loved was the Pys Ed article. I had 2 PE teachers that I really got along with, and I did well in their classes.
    The others seemed to be disinterested in teaching us anything, and would ignore any soreness or inability to do exactly what they said.
    I hated running for years because of how I was pushed to it, and it’s only been after school years, when I’ve learned alone about weights, walking and later running, that I’ve come to enjoy fitness.
    I always swam well, thanks to swimming club, and now I am a runner. In my last year of my 30s I have ran my first ever 5k!
    A sensible program, the c25k program, helped me ease into it over 9 weeks. Not just being told to run in a one hour class a week!
    I really feel as if I’ve achieved something. I wish PE teachers would just try to help kids love exercise, and encourage them.
    Now I just wish I coud run into an old PE teacher and inform them of my lifestyle now, and how I’m not as useless as they thought I was ;-)
    Anyway, thanks for a thought provoking lovely links. It’s always good but I loved this one