Lovely Links: 6/24/11

I’m totally thrilled to have been featured in yesterday’s Star Tribune, the Minneapolis daily paper! Huge thanks to reporter Sara Glassman, who also writes irresistibly fun Twin Cities e-newsletter Pop Fizz Daily, to which you should ALL subscribe.

And! I’ll be on 107.1 FM’s ShopGirls tomorrow morning! The show is from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., and I believe I go on around shortly after 11:30 a.m. You can listen online or to the podcast afterwards.¬† I’ll also post audio as soon as I can.

The Academichic gals are doing another Dress Your Best challenge. Anyone participating?

Angeline’s fabulous cheat sheet has great tips for effective outlet mall shopping. Because we all know it can be hella overwhelming.

This post on the benefits and pitfalls of competition among women highlights some interesting statistics, and explores some fascinating perspectives.

Joelle does stark white with sprinkles of bright color so beautifully.

On the flip side of our discussion of body hair management and its social implications, here’s an amazing new blog from a woman with alopecia. (Cheers, Shawn.)

Pretty sure I’ll be trying this cutout-back jacket DIY for fall. SO cool.

Oh, how I loved Jessi Arrington’s TED talk about wearing nothing new. Also now happily subscribed to her blog, since she’s a self-described color addict. Especially this post about the phrase “take it with a grain of salt.” (Thanks, Leela!)

Bessie Coleman: Determined, brave, and totally badass.

And speaking of old school icons, here are a few amazing and inspirational quotes from Marilyn Monroe.

Insightful and thought-provoking musings on cultural appropriation in fashion, where to draw the line, and why wearing items from other cultures seems to have an irresistible allure.

Autumn points out that, “Fair meant beautiful before it meant light-complected, not the other way around,” and explores how the two meanings have begun to mesh over time.

Newly enamored of The Dewey Decimals, a blog run by a couple of smart, sassy, stylish women who make lots of Pride and Prejudice references.

Also just discovered Shen Dove this week, and completely adore her laid-back, retrto-influenced style. (Via Spoils of Wear.)

Would you wear a knotted button-down shirt? (You’ll find out my answer tomorrow!)

Lexy’s prom story and fabulously bold prom dress that she designed herself made me smile.

Time to stop hating the belly. Word.

More than a little excited about Mad Men costume designer Janie Bryant’s upcoming line for Banana Republic. WOW. (Via PrettyLittleMrs)

“Now in my forties, I sling my style in bold broad strokes, and relish the fancies of others. I eschew the conventional, embrace the original. My quirks, once shamefully hidden, are now proudly paraded, shown off like prized peacocks.”

More fabulous advice for those of you hoping to hone your thrifting skills.

I’ll be hosting a live chat over at the Coffee Talk Community this coming Monday at 7 p.m. CST – come by to share your figure flattery tips and tricks.

Charlie looks smashing in all black, topped with a sculptural hat.

College Candy offers some quick, cheap, cute options for nailing the nautical look this season.

Wanna see what a professional fashion stylist brings to a shoot? Here ya go.

What do you do with a jersey skirt that hits at an awkward length? Why, pair it with a sassy leopard-print tee and hike it up!

RK outlines her ethical dilemma with personal style blogging and asks for reader input.

Turns out, Dorothy Parker got writer’s block, too.

And from the Department of Random: BABY SLOTHS. (I’ve seen this vid before I know it, but Sarah Von reminded me of its existence this week.)

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  • I am loving that Jessi A video and plan to repost and review as inspiration! And I want to kiss a sloth.

  • Congrats on the newspaper mention! And I just found Shen Dove via Spoils of Wear too and followed her right away. She’s totally fabulous!

  • I really, really love these posts of yours with all the links. I love getting to see things that I otherwise would have missed. Hope you have a great weekend!

  • Sal, congrats on all the great press!

    • Sal

      Thanks, Terri! I’m thrilled!

  • Sal – I just had to click through my reader today to say that you do the best weekly link round-up I’ve seen online! Between the great content and compelling descriptions, I always am clicking through to at least half of what you post. So – *thank you* for all the work that must go into making this awesome.

  • Jen

    Baby sloths!!! Gaaaah!

    Great links, too. But… BABY SLOTHS! I die.

  • The sloths are just adorable, also adorable from my own DoR: the baby skunk running around the fair grounds in Jackson this morning while we got ready for Rockapalooza. Cute, and I wanted to play with it, but did not want to take a tomato juice bath later.

  • MJ

    The blog post on cultural appropriation in fashion was very interesting IMO. I’d love to hear your thoughts on it.
    For me, I think there’s a line. I do own some Turkish protective eye bracelets (FYI that lots of the vendors & just random people in Turkey will come up & try & pin an eye on you for protection. We were even given eyes along with a purchase) as well as a kimono jacket (Haori) & a traveling kimono (Michiyuki). For me these are style pieces & while I treat them with respect I don’t feel I am appropriating an entire culture.
    There are several items I would not wear (sari, white kimono, Native American headress to name a few) but I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t tempted to try & wear a sari. They are so beautiful & flowing & vibrant IMO that every time I see one I wish I could wear it. Same with a Salwar Kameez. Gorgeous colors & flowing fabrics are a love of mine.
    I personally think that fashion is so influenced by other cultures (Nehru jacket anyone??) that to draw hard lines can only cause problems. I think the trick is figuring out where the line is between ‘homage’ & ‘inappropriateness’. For example, I worked for 2 years in a place where several conservative Muslim women worked. They were fully covered except for hands & face but they didn’t wear a burka or any type of covering garment. They dressed in Western clothing, just the more modest forms of it. Because of them I started experimenting a bit more with dresses over pants & other funky layered & covered looks. I did not, OTOH, wear a headscarf and I found my looks, while body covering, tended to be more form fitting than what was worn by the women I worked with.
    I also wonder about tees & other garments that show a member of a culture in certain dress. From my trip to Turkey I have a beautiful scarf that depicts a Sufi dancer (AKA Whirling Dervish). Its a drawing, not an actual picture but I wonder what opinions would be on my wearing it. I tried very hard to be culturally sensitive when visiting Turkey & making my purchases but seeing the dervishes was a highlight of my trip & I wanted something to remind me of that.
    Tis a quandry & I think its given me a lot more to think about. Thanks for the brain stretcher!

  • Wow Sal, congratulations on your print interview and the radio show – that’s great news! Can’t wait to hear the radio podcast:) xo

  • Anat

    I just wanted to say that you always descirbe the links in such a tantillizing way, I click through all of them!

    Congratulations on the press, waiting to hear the podcast…

  • Thank you for another kind shout-out – I have to second the reader above and say: well done on putting together a great selection of links. There are some juicy posts here!

  • Miss T

    Re: Stop hating the belly, while I understand the spirit of the column was directed toward women who have no real belly fat (just the natural curve that all women have) but fear it makes them look fat, there are REAL dangers to ACTUAL belly fat that women absolutely need to be aware of. See WebMD article here: http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20081112/belly-fat-doubles-death-risk That fat around the belly is not the same as fat around the thighs, for example: belly fat is considered “metabolically active” and is often indicative of a high level of “bad” cholesterol. I know from first-hand knowledge, too — I am overall very slender but have a modest layer of fat around the belly and, as my doctor says, “alarmingly high cholesterol” (we are dealing with it). Women are already under-diagnosed and under-treated when it comes to heart disease, so I would say, yes, actually, we SHOULD hate the belly fat.

  • Thank you Sally! xxx

  • Congratulations on hometown stardom!

    As ever, fantastic links. I’m particularly thankful for the thoughtful discussion of cultural appropriation–pleased to see the complexity the blogger took. And thank you for including me!

  • Cel

    Holy frigging adorable baby sloths!

  • Oh my gosh! I was peeking through The Dewey Decimals stats and I found out that you linked to us. What a wonderful birthday surprise! Thanks so much for showing our little blog some love and we promise to keep the Austen love up!

  • Thank you so much for spotlighting our little blog! It means so much to us and we’re so in love with you+your blog.

    I’m absolutely dying over the Mad Men Banana Republic mash up. It’s brilliant and will take over my bank account. I also love sloths and have watched your video about 3 times in a row. hahahaha, thank you!

    Camille