Lovely Links: January 22

Gotta start this week with a quick PSM: Do you have $10 to spare? $5? Anything at all? PLEASE consider donating to the American Red Cross, Yele Haiti, Doctors without Borders, UNICEF, International Medical Corps, or any of the other groups helping the victims of last week’s earthquake.

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Vanessa’s Love 365 Project is inspiring and uplifting. Talk about an ode to self-love!

Fluevog has a new person posting a pair a day in Everyday Fleuvogs. If you think these shoes are too unusual for everyday wear, this feature is really eye-opening.

This woman has been losing the same ten pounds for years … and I can relate. (Thanks to Solo Lisa for the link.)

How do you feel about your age
? Comfortable enough to reveal it to anyone?

Ever wanted to design your own shoes? (Via StyleFrizz.)

Hey, you sewists with the frosty ladyparts! Give this wool-knickers-from-an-old-sweater tutorial a go, and let me know if it’s as fabulous as it appears to be. (Thanks to Sarah for the link!)

Tanya Gold hates fashion. And Susie Bubble believes Tanya is oversimplifying things. Your thoughts?

Tricia cooked up a wonderfully thought-provoking post on the relationship between ugliness and beauty in clothing, and why we are drawn to certain types of ugly.

A fab little tutorial on how to tie a 1940s-style headscarf from Vixen Vintage.

Did you think that a leather dress could never look classy? The ladies at We Wear Things will set you straight.

The Zaftig Chicks found out the hard way that sometimes the Fat Acceptance movement isn’t all that accepting.

Lovely Eyeliah hosted a virtual birthday party, and all her bloggy friends showed up dressed to the nines.

The College Candy gals feel that the recent spate of plus-sized photo spreads in fashion mags is getting a bit exploitative. Do you agree?

Few of us can afford the recommended pieces, but the slideshow and descriptions are both great for inspiration: How to dress like Betty, Joan, and Peggy from Mad Men.

When I put on a scarf that big, I just look like a dweeb. Who is drowning in wool. Oh, to be a seasoned mondo-scarf wearer!

A remarkably sound argument for why Lady Gaga is an excellent role model for young girls. Oh, and the author is a high school senior. A smartypants in the best sense of the word!

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  • Vanessa

    Thanks for linking to me, Sally! I really appreciate it! My favorite link you posted was the essay on losing the same pounds for ten years. I love that Littmann's daughters are making her think differently about weight. Kids really are so perceptive, and it's probably harder than ever to help them develop good body image. A lot of it certainly starts with the parents. As a young girl, I was (and still am) overweight, and my mother was never okay with how I looked. She is overweight, too, and all she does is talk about food and dieting and how awful it was to be fat. I think she was a big influence on me, especially when my self esteem was really at its lowest. I lost about 30 pounds at one point and she was so proud. It put this kind of crushing pressure on me, though. I remember a time when I decided to indulge in a soda with dinner– I had basically quit drinking soda– and my mother saw me and had a fit. She accused me of "throwing it all away" and asked "why are you doing this to yourself?!" and I felt so guilty and ashamed that I threw the soda down the drain and went upstairs crying. If I recall, I didn't eat dinner that night.

    Gaining it back, in part for that reason, has been really hard on me, even though I feel more confident now than I ever did when I was thin. I hope that when I have kids, I can help them to feel good about their bodies at whatever size they are, while still helping them be healthy.

  • Shanna Suburbia

    I loved the article about Lady Gaga! Even though she's constantly being criticized for being weird, the girl really has talent and she's so much stronger just for being different. I still can't believe she's only 23.

  • Eyeliah

    Thanks for the link love, will be sure to check out the others. 🙂 The Lady Gaga argument sounds great.

  • JESSICA LAUREN

    Happy 2010! I just stumbled upon your virtual chronicle and absolutely love your world view.

    If you get a chance, swing by and say hello. I would love to hear about all your wants, musings, and distractions. Thank you darling and wonderful blog, I will be back regularly.

    http://www.itapetingabella.com/

  • Kate @ Très Lola

    I tweeted my brief reaction to Tanya Gold's piece.

    "Dear Tanya Gold, Yes, each morning when deciding between jeans or a skirt, I feel awfully oppressed. http://bit.ly/5EqqsI #areyoukiddingme"

    I'm not really a Tanya Gold fan, I must admit, ever since she moaned about Glastonbury festival… anyone that doesn't enjoy Glasto = kill joy! It's one of the happiest places on earth, you've got to try hard to not find something to enjoy there.

    Now, off the tangent, I'm going to go browse a few of those links you so lovingly compiled.

  • Deborah

    Sal – you have the best links ever and always.

    I just added 4 sites to my reader damn you! 🙂

  • kristophine

    The piece on the FA movement was really interesting to me, in large part because a lot of what I research–stereotyping and prejudice–ties into identity politics. The concept of a social movement as demanding obedience to rigid strictures is not new, and it's been the part of the queer movement that I've had the most difficulty adjusting to in the city. Back home, all five of us out queers stuck together, regardless of whether we were male, female, homosexual, bisexual, transgendered, whatever, because we were our only support. Here, where my school alone has as many students as my old town had residents, there's a lot more fracturing. And I can't help but feel the bloggers' pain at realizing that something they thought was welcoming and accepting is still a manifestation of basic human nature: categorize, prefer, exclude.

  • Kath Meusey

    I LOVE Fluevogs, but wish they made more with a lower heel. I can't work heel, much as I try, and so most of them are out of my league.

  • Jamie Cattanach

    Um, what? Lady Gaga's not particularly thin? Hmmm, not according to -my- analysis of Google Images…

  • ebinbaby

    Sewists with frosty lady parts – love it!! I'm still laughing… 😀

  • Oranges And Apples

    I read the Tanya fold article with interest, and I found it to be a really powerful piece. As long as you take it simply as her own personal experience. I don't think she says anywhere in the actual article that fashion is oppressing, that seems to me something that the editors have stuck on at the end. What I dislike most about the question at the bottom of the article is that it assumes that fashion can be either oppressive OR fun. CLEARLY it is both, to different extents for different people at different times.

    I might do a post about this, because I can feel the urge to make this comment go on forever. But I am resisting.