This Week I Love …

… the abundance of high-rise styles currently on the market.

I know high rises aren’t for everyone. Low and even mid rises hit me at exactly the wrong spot and make me unspeakably miserable, and depending on how you’re built high rises may do the same for you. But they’re the ONLY style of jeans and pants I can wear, and I’m thrilled to see a variety of washes, sizes, and styles available right now.

Here are a few styles and brands I love:

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Karen Kane Zuma Twill Jean – $109

We’ll start with my standby: Karen Kane denim. I know this is a lot to pay for a pair of jeans, but I’ve worn my pairs on the blog and off and just straight-up adore them. I bought a pair of black Old Navy jeans about 9 months after I got my black Zumas, and the ON pair has already faded twice as much. Lots of stretch but no sagging, a slim leg, and a nice high rise. There’s a cropped version, too, in some fun colors for fall.

All Karen Kane jeans and pants are high-rise, so if you’re not into skinnies, there might still be options for ya. Plus sizes available in some styles. Made in the U.S.A.

cn9026067Gap 1969 Resolution True Skinny High-rise – $34.99 – $79.95
use code COOL for 40% off until midnight

My other go-to right now is Gap, a brand that resisted high rises for a billion years before unveiling a great little collection earlier this year. They’ve got dark and light washes, several levels of distress, and tall and petite sizes in many styles. I’ve also got a couple of pairs of Gap Factory high rise skinnies that are super comfy, but tend to bag a bit after a day of wearing.

everlane slouchy trouser

Everlane Slouchy Trouser – $120

I will admit that I’m yet to place my first Everlane order, but based on Grechen’s opinion alone I’m more than willing to recommend the brand. The company is extremely transparent about its sourcing and production methods, and dedicated to lower markups than traditional retail. These pants are an unlined mid-weight wool twill, and in a cut that would look equally appropriate at the office or at a funky restaurant.

nydj straight leg

Pretty much any pair of NYDJ pants or jeans – $30 – $150 (this is the pair shown above)

I’m linking you to 6pm above, but also check Amazon, Nordstrom, and eBay for great pricing, especially if you’re looking for past-season styles or colors. Again, a spendy brand at full price, but comfortable, well-made, and available in a mind-blowing array of colors and styles, many in regular, petite, and plus sizes. The brand recommends buying a size down from your regular to optimize the “tummy panel,” but that has never worked for me. I buy my regular size and am far comfier in them. Made in the U.S.A.

jny sloane

Jones New York Sloane – $33 -$89

Again, the vast majority of JNY styles are high rise, but this classic wide-leg dress pant is incredibly versatile. Pocket-free and pared-down, it’s made from a seasonless, stretchy poly blend and comes in petite and plus sizes, too. Macy’s has some cute new JNY styles for fall.

talbots pants plus

Pretty much any pair of Talbots pants or jeans – $29 – $139 (this is the pair shown above)

I don’t wear this brand much myself anymore, but still praise them constantly for their size diversity – most styles are available in regular, petite, and plus sizes with a decent though smaller group in petite plus and tall sizes. Talbots will occasionally do a mid-rise, but the vast majority of their jeans and pants sit at the waist. And now’s a great time to buy since dozens of pairs are 50% off or more.

Premium denim brands like Paige and J Brand are hopping on the high-waisted bandwagon, too, showing everything from skinnies to flares, and you can get some great deals on them through the Nordstrom Anniversary sale, running until August 2.

Who else is a high-rise fan? Any other styles or brands to recommend?

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Seeing Your Body Through the Lens of Style

summer_oufits
Before I became interested in dressing and style, I avoided thinking about my body. At all costs. I didn’t look in the mirror if I didn’t have to, didn’t focus much energy or attention on how my outfits interacted with my figure, and did my utmost to think about anything besides my own physicality. Because of this choice, the information I was given about my body came almost exclusively from external sources. And none of it was good news: I was chubby, disproportionate, my breasts were too small and my hips were too big, my arms were flabby and so was my stomach. Virtually all of this information was comparative: I was flabby compared to Gwyneth Paltrow, my breasts were too small compared to Victoria’s Secret models … you know the drill. I studiously ignored my body, hoping its perceived inadequacies would diminish if I pretended I was a brain in a jar. And yet this comparative information still crept in and made me feel inadequate.

I’ve struggled with anxiety for over a decade, but only recently learned something important about the power of my own fears: Like most people, I avoid the things that make me feel anxious and afraid. This avoidance brings temporary relief, which amounts to a reward response. And the longer this cycle continues, the more likely I am to avoid these anxiety-producing things and the more powerful their fear factors become. When I allow myself to consider and face the things that cause me to feel anxious – generally with a “what’s the worst that can happen?” attitude in tow – I can diffuse some of their power over me. This is not to say that I’ve decided to immediately and aggressively confront every last one of my triggers. But it means that I now understand something essential about my body image struggles: I may have been making myself feel worse about my body by pretending it didn’t exist. Because during those years of avoidance, I was occasionally forced to deal with and contemplate my body. And when I was forced to look at it, “evaluate” it, address it in some way, that experience became extremely loaded, difficult, and sometimes painful.

I know many women who, like me, spent years studiously ignoring their bodies before finally deciding to make a change. Some chose to begin the conversation through fitness or food. Some chose meditation or yoga. Some found motherhood to be an awakening into discussion with their physical forms. For reasons I didn’t quite grasp at the time, I began to examine my body through the lens of clothing.

The world of fashion provides fertile ground for self-loathing. There are infinite messages about what women “can” and “cannot” wear based on their figures, beliefs about superior body sizes and shapes, and bizarre hierarchies of beauty reinforced by the fashion machine. But instead of focusing on those things, I reached for the information that clothing offered to me about my body. It said, “Skirts won’t constrict your hips or squeeze your midsection,” and “Your small bust makes it possible for you to wear a huge variety of shirts.” It said, “Belts draw the eye to your waist,” and “Boots make you feel invincible.” Instead of learning about my body through it’s weight or size, its response to food or exercise, I learned about my body through its relationship to the clothing I chose to wear. I learned how it is shaped by experimenting with clothes, and I learned what felt good to wear and what felt like a struggle.

And I learned all of those things about my specific body. Not my body on a spectrum, not my body compared to an ideal body but instead my body in relative isolation. Although I certainly had my moments of cursing skinny jeans and feeling frustrated that they didn’t look or feel “right” to me, I was mostly able to glean information about my body that felt fairly factual and scientific. I have broad hips and a small waist for my build. I have small breasts and wrists and ankles for my build. I have a high waistline and full upper arms for my build. It was all about me, and that made it feel less loaded.

Definitely an imperfect system for learning. After all, there was still comparison at play: Someone designed those clothes and made decisions about how big and small and proportioned they would be. And that someone was using those same beauty-body blueprints to guide their design decisions. Because I am privileged enough to fall somewhere within that socially-sanctioned spectrum, I was able to try on and contemplate a huge variety of styles and have them fit me. (More or less.) This is not possible for every woman, and for many there may be layers of implied judgment in that not-fitting that would make this approach far too painful to be beneficial.

But it worked for me and it might work for others. Depending on how you’re wired, considering your figure in terms of how it works with and against clothes can feel more constructive and informative than considering your figure as it compares to BMI charts or the bodies of other women. “Too small for that dress” or “too tall for those pants” are informative and specific, and lack the stinging judgment of “too small” or “too tall” period. Your body is naked sometimes, and naked is its natural state. But you go about most of your life clothed, so learning about your body through dressing it can be both enlightening and beneficial.

As a person who loves and explores style, I understand my body now in ways I never did before. I don’t fear it, I don’t avoid it, and I feel like I can converse with it through dressing and clothing. And I’m much happier now that we’re on speaking terms again.

This is a refreshed and revived post from the archive.

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Lace Palazzo Pants

Junarose top, Bershka statement necklace, Aliexpress sunglasses, Asos Curve Lace Palazzo pants, Michael Kors Selma bagJunarose top, Bershka statement necklace, Aliexpress sunglasses

Top- Junarose (similar)

Necklace- Bershka (old, similar here and here)

Sunglasses- AliExpress

Pants- Asos Curve

Bag- Michael Kors

This outfit was all about staying cool during an extremely humid day and palazzo pants are turning out to be a nice option instead of the usual shorts+ top combination I reach for. I thought these lace pants were a nice combination of shorts and palazzo pants :)

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